harmonious humility and hysterical animosity

Myths of the Near Future

Myths of the Near Future (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

English: The arrogance of youth. Despite numer...

English: The arrogance of youth. Despite numerous notices warning of the dangers of approaching too closely to cliff edges on Trwyn y Witch,these lads stroll blithely along on the very edge. A few days after this photograph was taken, another appeared in a national newspaper of youths sitting on the edge of cliffs at Beachy Head! (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

The more terrified I am that some presumption of mine may be inaccurate, then the more tenaciously I may defend against perceived criticism. I may defend by condemning others for (allegedly) condemning me, by argumentatively justifying, and by ridiculing perceived critics for some past point of disagreement. That intense reaction can be called shame or guilt or pride or ego.

 

 

 

I resist the exploration of my presumption. I present my sincerity as something deserving respect. I focus away from the accuracy of presumptions toward my sincerity, my righteousness, what is familiar to me.

 

 

 

My process is terrified, desperate, and, in the extreme, raging passionately with sincere self-righteousness. It is hysterical.

 

 

Stuff your eyes with wonder . . . live as if y...

Stuff your eyes with wonder . . . live as if you’d drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It’s more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories. Thanks Sweet Arrogance for the Editing + Tittle (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

My myths are not questionable because they are not myths. My myths are not open to exploration. I do not have any myths. I do not have any presumptions. Any implication that I might is an accusation deserving to be attacked viciously.

 

 

 

A drawing of a dining fly tent

A drawing of a dining fly tent (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

And so there is the story of the tent built on dry ground and the tent built on mud. Which one is more steady?

 

 

With the tent built on dry ground, the stakes stayed firmly in the ground. The ropes of the tent stayed tight. The wind came but the tent just flapped a bit and remained stable.

 

 

Wooden stake holding guy rope

Wooden stake holding guy rope (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

With the tent erected in the mud, the stakes went in very easily, but they were so loose that heavy rocks were put on top of them to keep the stakes in place. The ropes of the tent sagged, but there was enough tension on the ropes to raise the tent (after a great deal of time and effort).

 

 

Then the winds came, plus more rain. Inside of the tent there were a small crew of people who had raised the tent. The youngest one asked “why is the tent sagging?”

 

 

The Tent

The Tent (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

This was obviously just too much! The elder shouted “who do you think you are to dare criticize the way that we raised the tent? We have the right number of ropes. We have the right number of stakes. We even made an extra effort to put stones across the stakes to hold them in securely. You just do not appreciate how hard we have worked on this tent! You are just a negative person who is investing in fear instead of unconditional love.”

 

 

This is the face of arrogance

This is the face of arrogance (Photo credit: phunkstarr)

 

 

The young questioner was a bit stunned. A different approach might go better. “I do appreciate your hard work. I simply am curious whether you agree that the tent is sagging more than usual?”

 

 

English: This picture is taken with help of Mr...

English: This picture is taken with help of Mr Shiva Shrestha (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

The reaction was even more intense. “Have you ever heard that curiosity killed the cat? You are rebellious. You are arrogant. If anything goes wrong with the tent, it must be because of your lack of loyalty. Also, four months ago, you made a mistake in the raising of a tent and I have always wondered about that. Was it intentional? Did you sabotage this tent again? Is that what you are trying to confess?”

 

 

The young questioner said “Wow, it is getting really stressful in here. Does anyone else need to go out of the tent to pee like I do?”

 

 

The elder screamed “hold it! You need to answer the question whether you sabotaged the tent. No one let this one out until we get the answer! You have disrupted the harmony of our crew. Isn’t harmony important to you? First, you have brought hysteria and animosity to our crew. Now you want to destabilize everything by going outside to pee. Look, can’t you see that this tent is unstable? We cannot let you out to pee because all of that zipping and unzipping might be enough to bring down the whole house of cards, you idiot!”

 

 

 

Look up on others (DSC2773)

Look up on others (DSC2773) (Photo credit: Fadzly @ Shutterhack)

Illustration from a collection of myths.

Illustration from a collection of myths. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

So, it is not always so obvious when there is a hysterical avoidance of the questioning of a presumption (such as whether a particular tent is sturdy). However, now that we have reviewed an example of hysterical animosity (as distinct from harmonious humility), let’s review again the original statements. Perhaps they will be more clear for you this time.

 

 

 

The more terrified I am that some presumption of mine may be inaccurate, then the more tenaciously I may defend against perceived criticism. I may defend by condemning others for (allegedly) condemning me, by argumentatively justifying, and by ridiculing perceived critics for some past point of disagreement. That intense reaction can be called shame or guilt or pride or ego.
 
I resist the exploration of my presumption. I present my sincerity as something deserving respect. I focus away from the accuracy of presumptions toward my sincerity, my righteousness, what is familiar to me.
 
My process is terrified, desperate, and, in the extreme, raging passionately with sincere self-righteousness. It is hysterical.
 
My myths are not questionable because they are not myths. My myths are not open to exploration. I do not have any myths. I do not have any presumptions. Any implication that I might is an accusation deserving to be attacked viciously (of course!).
Illustration from a collection of myths.

Illustration from a collection of myths. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

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