Posts Tagged ‘notice’

unmasking god

April 16, 2012

Look out and see a mask.


One mask is the body of flesh. Are you that mask, or are you the one looking out through the changing body of flesh?

image from http://www.headless.org by sam blight

One mask is the mask of sensations. Are you that mask, or are you the one witnessing the changing of the sensations?

One mask is the mask of thoughts. Are you that mask, or are you the one witnessing the changing of the thoughts?

Are you a changing thing? Look out! (Or… look in.)

Simply notice whether you are a changing thing or not. Are you the one witnessing the changing world or are you the changing world?

Are you eternal life, unchanging, unborn, undying? Are you the one for whom the world happens… with it’s changing bodies of flesh, changing sensations, changing thoughts, and changing seasons?

Look out and see a cloud in the sky. Are you the clouds in the sky? Are you the sky? Are you the one witnessing the sky and clouds?

Look down at the ground and at the body between your gaze and the ground. Are you the ground? Are you the body? Are you the one witnessing the ground and the body formed of the dust of the earth?

Notice the movement of breathing through the body. Are you the breathing? Are you the one witnessing the breathing?

Notice the movements of words and other imaginations. Are you the words? Are you only one word at a time? Are you always the same specific word?

When you hear words or read words, are you those words? Are you some words but not others?

Are you some imaginations but not others? Are you some sounds but not others? Are you some letters but not others? Are you some shapes but not others? Are you some objects but not others? Are you some sights but not others? Are you some perceptions but not others?

Are you only a certain particular thing that you notice? Are you any one temporary, changing thing? Are you a concept?

Do you have a future now? Do you have a past now?

When are you? Do you ever happen at any time other than now?

Where are you? Do you ever notice that you are anywhere else except here? How big is here? By the way, how long does now last?

How are you? What are you? Do you have any idea what you are? Are you an idea? Is any idea required for you to already be however you may be?

Does any particular noticing effect whether or not you are? Does not noticing anything effect whether or not you are?

Does whether you are or not now depend on any changing condition? Does whether you are or not now depend on any changing circumstance? Does whether you are or not now depend on any changing sensation? Does whether you are or not now depend on any changing thought? Does whether you are or not now depend on any changing body? Does whether you are or not now depend on the presence or absence of any language?

Are you here now? Do you have any choice as to whether or not you are already here now? Can you actually change whether or not you are already here now? Can anything or anyone change whether or not you are already here now?

Is there any time you are not already here now? Is there any place you are not already here now?

Do you have any direct experience evidencing that you are not what is referenced by the word God? Do you have any direct experience evidencing that you are precisely what is referenced by the word God? Are you eternal life, unchanging, unborn, undying, the origin of all perception, of all change, of all birth, of all death, of all masks, of all bodies,  and even of these very words?

See part 2 here: the vine of many branches: http://jrfibonacci.wordpress.com/the-vine-of-many-branches/

Published on: Dec 29, 2009

Related articles

an ancient sacred metaphor: the vine of many branches

March 23, 2012

The vine of many branches

Notice any distinctions now: anything. Notice the distinctions of the colors of green and anything that is not green. Notice the distinctions of the ideas of loud and quiet. Notice the distinctions of the words quiet and quite, or the letters O and Z, or the following shapes: O and Z. There is a distinction between a shape and a letter, one word and another, different ideas or labels, and different colors.

Notice the distinction between all of those contrasting distinctions and the act of perceiving itself. Perceiving is what makes the difference between a shape of a Z and a letter Z. There is no external difference between the shape of a Z and the letter Z. One is witnessed as a shape without any label of it being anything but a distinct shape. The other is not just that shape, but that shape as a symbolic representation of a buzzing sound: “zzzz.” The symbolic representation of the buzzing sound is a letter. That same sound could be represented by a different shape (and in other  encodings of written alphabets, a different shape is used to represent that sound).

So, the process of perceiving is also distinct from whatever is perceived. Further, the process of noticing is itself distinct from the process of perceiving, which can go on by itself with or without any noticing.

Further, can there be a shape present without noticing it? Just look at the following shape and then focus on it briefly, then focus on something else: Z. Notice if the shape changes even when noticing comes and goes: Again, here is a Z shape. Look at the Z and focus on it, then, without removing the Z from your field of vision, simply stop focusing on it briefly, and then focus on it again: Z. Does the presence of the shape depend on noticing it? Isn’t the shape itself entirely independent of noticing it?

In ancient poetry, these distinctions have been made of the actual process of perceiving, the various particular objects of perception, and the process of noticing. Noticing is referenced in the poetic language of psychology as “conscious attention,” as distinct from processes that are unconscious or subconscious or even something called super-conscious. However, that terminology is rather abstract.

Here is some simpler poetry for the distinctions of perceiving, perceptions, and noticing. Perceiving is the capacity to perceive, and that is like a parent or Father. Without the capacity to perceive, there would be no perceptions. The perceptions are like a child or Son- an experience resulting from the originating Father of the capacity to perceive, what we might even call the ‘fruit.”

Finally, completing the trinity of the major psychological traditions of the last several thousand years, the process of noticing is like a Spirit or Ghost (or what modern psychology calls consciousness or attention). Sure, the capacity to perceive and the perceiving of various perceptions may happen by themselves, but when one notices not just the various external objects of perception but the concept of the process of perceiving, that perceiving of the concept of perceiving as distinct from external perceptions is like a rebirth of sorts.

When noticing the process of perceiving itself, then all perceptions are recognized as mere transitory effects. One may have identified with particular transitory perceptions (as in concepts or words) or even against particular transitory perceptions (as in concepts or words).

However, noticing the process of perceiving itself, which is not transitory, but boundless or everlasting or eternal- that is quite distinct! The process of perceiving persists even as a seeming infinite multitude of transitory perceptions come and go.

When one notices the process of perceiving itself, then one may identify with it directly- rather than identify exclusively with a particular transitory object of perception, such as the temporary appearance of a physical body. In poetic language, one might say that “the Father and I are one” (I identify with the eternal process of perceiving, which, by the way, is the same for all creatures). One might even say that “I am the vine” while the various multitudes of transitory perceptions are the branches.

Even closer may be that there is a single process of perceiving, with many distinct noticings of that same singular fundamental processes (like branches of a vine), and then an infinity of transitory “fruit.” Of course, all of the vine is the vine. The branches are all part of the vine and so are the fruit. By the way, the fruit do not so much belong fundamentally to any particular branch, but to the vine itself.

Published on: Dec 29, 2009

Related articles

how to stop suffering

January 6, 2012

 

To ask “how do I end suffering” is to perpetuate suffering. Notice that suffering is a practice, a behavior, a habit.

How do you stop walking? You can just allow yourself to stand still, which does not require any effort and is not so much a new doing of a stopping… as the ending of an old activity or process of walking.
You can’t really stop walking. You can only walk or not walk.
So, how do you stop suffering? You can’t really stop suffering. You can simply suffer or not suffer.
How do you stop agonizing? You simply agonize or not.
How do you stop whistling? You simply whistle or not.
By the way, if you think that the suffering is you, you can either think that or not. How do you stop thinking? You either think or not.
What notices thinking and walking and suffering and whistling and agonizing? Agonizing does not notice agonizing. Whistling does not notice whistling.
Notice who you are. Suffering or not suffering is only a problem if you claim to be one who has that problem as your personal, private problem. Whistling or not not whistling is only a problem if you claim to be the one who has that problem as your personal, private problem. Walking or not walking, agonizing or not agonizing, identifying a problem or not identifying a problem are all various actions that you can either perform or not.
What is the best problem to have? What is the right way to agonize? How do I stop suffering? How can I become more like I already am?
These are all silly questions. You can either ask silly questions or not.
You can even pretend to be the victim of your own agonizing. You can pretend that your problems are causing you to suffer, but perhaps you have been agonizing various problems into your experience.
Now, stop suffering. End suffering. Then, push so hard on the wind that you stop the wind.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 289 other followers

%d bloggers like this: